Introduction

The purpose of this online Handbook for music students is to supplement the Undergraduate and Graduate Announcements with those procedures, policies, forms, and other details not contained in those publications. It is neither intended to replace the Announcements and Policies website nor to include information already in those publications and websites.

The student is expected to consult the Announcements for requirements and policies pertaining to his/her degree program. The Announcements are online. The student is responsible for familiarizing him/herself with the Announcements, this Handbook, the Class Schedule and other online information for important semester dates, e.g. registration period, deadlines for adding/dropping courses, deadlines for withdrawal from courses, auditing courses, exam schedule, fees and expenses, etc. For these and other matters, the student should consult https://www.catholic.edu/academics/index.html.

The university also maintains an undergraduate student handbook http://policies.cua.edu/studentlife/studentconduct/conduct-full.cfm, containing important information for the undergraduate student body at large, and a graduate studies website http://graduatestudies.cua.edu/, containing important information for the graduate student body at large.

For all curricular questions, the student must consult with his/her adviser. For all other questions, email cua-music@cua.edu.

  • Academic Honesty

    It is the responsibility of each undergraduate and graduate student to familiarize him/herself with university policy on academic honesty by studying the information provided in the following link: http://policies.cua.edu/academicundergrad/integrityfull.cfm

  • Attendance and Grading Policies for Courses

    Attendance is required at all classes, lessons, rehearsals, and performances. The student is expected to consult the syllabus for each individual course and familiarize him/herself with the attendance policies for the courses in which he/she is enrolled. If an absence is unavoidable, it is the student’s responsibility to consult with the instructor, coach, conductor, or director. The student’s grade can be adversely affected by an unexcused absence. Consult the university policies page for more information.

     

  • Attendance and Grading Policies for Studio X

    • Attendance is required for all School of Music undergraduate Music majors.
    • Only one absence is allowed; students with more than one absence will receive a failing grade.
    • Students who have a course conflict will be excused from attending the Studio X sessions. They must fill out the Studio X Course Conflict Form (available in the main office) and submit it to their academic adviser at the beginning of the semester. The course in conflict must be a course required by one's curriculum and one that can only be taken at Studio X time.
    • The Studio X grades (pass/fail) will be determined at the end of each semester by the student’s academic adviser after reviewing the Studio X attendance forms.
  • Change of Degree Program Application

  • Change of Major Application

  • Consortium Registration

    (Adapted from the A&S Online Handbook)

    PURPOSE: To take a course at another univer­sity in the Washington Consortium of Universities.

    WHEN: Any semester except the semester when the student will graduate. Taking a Consortium course in a student’s final semester may delay graduation, because the required official grade report may not be available in time for Commencement.

    NOTES: A SPECIFIC RATIONALE IS REQUIRED, AND APPROVAL IS NOT AUTOMATIC.

    A student may not take through the Consortium a course that is regularly offered at CUA.

    Normally, a course will be approved only if it is required for the student's major or an approved minor program but not available on campus; or if it is a course in a language not taught at CUA.

    A Consortium course may not be audited or taken for a different number of credits than it carries at the offering institution.

    FORMS:

    • Consortium Request Form: Statement of Need
    • Consortium Registration Form (both available from the Consortium Coordinator, Office of Enrollment Services).

    PROCEDURE: All the steps outlined below must be completed.

    Obtain the Consortium Request Form and the Consortium Registration Form. Meet with your academic adviser. If the course is deemed appropriate, the adviser signs both forms. Take them to the Assistant Dean for Academics to evaluate the request. If the request is approved, take the signed forms to the Consortium Coordinator in the Office of Enrollment Services. Once all approval steps are complete, the Consortium Coordinator enters the information into the registration system. Students do not register directly on the web for Consortium courses.

    Show, but do not give, your copy of the Consortium Registration form to the course instructor. Keep your copy.

  • Continuous Enrollment, including information re: Academic Leave

    The student must consult the Announcements regarding university policy on continuous enrollment. This is to remind that students not registered for academic courses must register when taking comprehensive exams, defending one’s dissertation, or playing final, non-credit recitals. Doctoral dissertation defense no longer requires Cardinal Station enrollment. The following are the designations as listed in the Class Schedule booklet for ways to maintain continuous enrollment when one is not taking academic courses. The student must consult the Class Schedule booklet or go online to obtain the four-digit Cardinal Station number needed for registration, as the four-digit number changes each semester.

    For Comprehensive Exams:

    • MUS 698A Master’s Comps (with classes)
    • MUS 698B Master’s Comps (no classes)--Continuous enrollment is satisfied by this registration.
    • MUS 998A Doctoral Comps (with classes)
    • MUS 998B Doctoral Comps (no classes)--Continuous enrollment is satisfied by this registration.

    Note: A student must register for Comprehensive Exams for the semester in which he/she plans to take them. If the student does not complete the requirement or fails the exams, he/she must register again in a subsequent semester.

    For DMA Final Recital (0-credit, doctoral level only):

    • MUS 997A Doctoral Exam/Recital (with classes)
    • MUS 997B Doctoral Exam/Recital (no classes)

    Note: The above two MUS numbers are for registering for non-credit doctoral-level final degree recitals. Doctoral students must consult the Announcements for degree recitals that are credit-bearing.

     

    Academic Leave: All requests for Academic Leave must be made BEFORE the semester begins.

    Undergraduate students must consult the Office of the Dean of Students and obtain the form “Request for Leave of Absence or Permanent Withdrawal,” found at the following link: http://deanofstudents.cua.edu/resources-and-policies/time-away-from-cua.cfm. The form outlines the proper procedures to follow.

    Graduate students must complete an Academic Leave/Term Withdrawal Online Request Form through Graduate Studies.

    International students must also consult the Office of International Student and Scholar Services in addition to the offices above.

  • Departmental Consent, Prerequisites, and Permission of Instructor

    DEPARTMENTAL CONSENT

    A course designated as needing departmental consent means that a student cannot register him/herself in Cardinal Station without first receiving the written consent of the adviser (on the registration worksheet) to take the course in question. All MUPI Private Instruction courses are designated for departmental consent. Several MUS courses are also so designated. The course descriptions in the online catalog provide this information. Some courses require departmental consent to ensure that the proper prerequisites have been first successfully completed. Note: Obtaining departmental consent does NOT mean that the student is registered; it only means that the student has permission to register. The student must register him/herself.

    PREREQUISITES

    Some courses require the successful completion of a previous course or courses. For example, an undergraduate may not register for MUS 124 Harmony II without having successfully completed MUS 123 Harmony I. A graduate student may not register for MUS 712 Analytical Techniques II without first having taken the Theory Placement Exam and passed out of the requirement to MUS 491 Graduate Harmony Review. If the letter of admission of an incoming graduate student lists prerequisites, some of these may be taken along with graduate-level courses, such as language study; other prerequisites must be taken before more advanced courses. For example, a graduate student may not register for MUS 712 Analytical Techniques II if his/her letter of admission indicates MUS 321 Form and Analysis as a prerequisite to be fulfilled. The course descriptions in the online catalog provide information about prerequisites.

    PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR

    This term is used for a course for which an instructor makes an evaluation of a student's preparation for the course and grants permission for the student to take it. Often, departmental consent is not required in these cases. For example, dance instructors often evaluate students during the first few classes, to see if they are at the level required for the course or if they should be advised to continue at either a more advanced or more elementary level. The student would then be advised by the instructor to drop/add accordingly. The course descriptions in the online catalog provide information about permission of instructor.

  • Diploma Application Online

    In order to be considered for graduation, a complete audit is submitted to the dean by the student’s adviser. An audit is documentation that all degree requirements have been met. In addition, the student must apply for his/her diploma online using Cardinal Station. Students with questions should be directed to the Office of Enrollment Services for assistance.

    If a student does not apply for his/her diploma online, he/she cannot be considered for graduation, and a diploma cannot be prepared.

    There are three times during the calendar year when a student can receive his/her degree:

    • October—This means that the student has fulfilled all degree requirements the preceding Summer. In this case, the student does not enroll in Fall courses the semester of his/her graduation.
    • January—This means that the student has fulfilled all degree requirements the preceding Fall semester and must be active in the system (see continuous enrollment policy) in the Fall semester.
    • May—This means that the student has fulfilled all degree requirements the preceding Spring semester and must be active in the system (see continuous enrollment policy) in the Spring semester.

    The university holds a commencement ceremony in May at which those receiving their degrees in May are required to attend and to which those having already received their degrees in October or January are invited to attend.

  • General Studies Requirements for B.A. Programs

    It is the goal of the Bachelor of Arts in Music degree to establish a diverse experience in the liberal arts. To that end, a large number of courses for the degree must be taken outside of music. General studies requirements for the B.A. in Music degree consist of:

    • three courses in philosophy
    • three courses in theology and religious studies
    • three courses in social/behavioral sciences
    • onecourse in math and two courses in mathematics/natural sciences
    • two courses in humanities outside of music
    • two courses at the intermediate level in a foreign language
    • one required literature course and one elective course in ancient or modern literature
    • one course in English composition

    In addition, each emphasis requires a certain number of free electives,which may be music (MUS) or non-music courses.No credits in an applied instrument (MUPI) may be used to fulfill the free elective requirement.

    CAUTION: No course taken pass/fail may fulfill a general studies requirement.

    The various areas of general studies requirements are outlined below:

    1. Philosophy
    2. Theology & Religious Studies
    3. Literature
    4. Foreign Language
    5. Mathematics / Natural Science
    6. Humanities
    7. Social and Behavioral Science
    8. English Composition

    1. Philosophy

    Philosophy 201 and 202 are required of all students in Music, and should be taken in the freshman year. (Students in the University Honors Program may substitute HSPH 101 and HSPH 102.) PHIL 201 and 202 are prerequisite for all other Philosophy courses. For their third required course in Philosophy, students may choose any 3-credit Philosophy course.

    2. Theology and Religious Studies

    Three courses are required in Theology & Religious Studies (TRS). These must include TRS 201 (taken in the freshman year) and two upper-level TRS courses (200-, 300-, 400- level). For detailed guidance consult the TRS undergraduate website.

    3. Literature

    All students in the School of Music must take HUM 101 in their sophomore year. One additional semester of literature is required: literature written in any language is acceptable, including in English translation. Also acceptable are courses in MDIA film studies, mythology (Greek & Roman or Norse), comparative literature, creative writing, honors HSHU 102 & 203, and honors HSCT 101 & 102.

    • NOTE: The following courses do not fulfill the literature requirement:
      • English writing (ENG 101, 101a, 103, 105, 111, 326, 327)
      • Courses in rhetoric, linguistics, grammar, history of language, and basic language instruction at the elementary or intermediate level.
      • FREN 203, 204, 330, 401; GER 203, 204, 401, 402; ITAL 203, 204; ML 521; SPAN 203, 204, 210, 211.
    4. Foreign Language

    A student must pass two semesters of any classical or modern foreign language at the intermediate level. Every student is expected to enroll in a foreign language course each semester until the requirement is completed.

    In Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Italian, Latin, and Spanish, intermediate level courses are numbered 103-104. (Heritage speakers substitute SPAN 210-211 for 103-104.)

    The distribution requirement in foreign language is fulfilled by the 103-104 courses, the 113 accelerated intermediate course (6 credits, by permission to highly qualified students only), orSPAN 210-211(for heritage speakers only).

    • NOTE: Courses in American Sign Language (ASL) do not fulfill the foreign language requirement.

    The language requirement may be waived if the student demonstrates the fluency of a native speaker in a language other than English, or if the student achieves a designated minimum score on either the SAT achievement test or a placement examination administered by this university when the student enters. There are specific guidelines for waiving the foreign language requirement: consult the School of Arts & Sciences.

    THREE IMPORTANT CAUTIONS:

    1. A grade of C- or higher in the preceding course is required for enrolling in a 102, 103, or 104 language course, or in SEM 242.
    2. Prior to continuing a language studied previously (for two or more years in high school or one year in college), a student must take the placement examination prior to continuing that language at CUA; if the student does not take the placement exam, no credit will be given for any CUA course in that previously-studied language.
    3. No student may take a language course forcreditbelow the level into which he or she has been placed, and no student whose language requirement has been waived may take the 101, 102, 112, 103, or 104, or 113 course in that language for credit.

    A student with a documented learning disability specific to language learning should contact CUA's Disability Support Services to discuss appropriate accommodations. See also Disability Accommodations in this handbook.

    5. Mathematics / Natural Science

    Students must complete three courses, one of which must be MATH, from among the following: Physical Anthropology (ANTH 105, 108, 204, 218, 254, 354), Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Honors Environmental Studies (HSEV 101 only), Mathematics (but not 108), or Physics. Statistics courses (ECON 323 and 324, PSY 322, SOC 301 or 503, EDUC 633, and SSS 501) are acceptable, as are PSY 304 and PSY 345. PSY 322 can be substituted for the MATH elective.

    • CAUTION: MATH 108 is a free elective only and does not fulfill this distribution requirement. MATH 101 (not offered after 2007-2008) carried no credit and fulfilled no degree requirement.
    • CAUTION: Not all Anthropology courses fulfill the natural science requirement. The student must check carefully into which distribution area an ANTH course falls.
    6. Humanities

    Students must complete two courses from among the following: Architecture (ARPL 101 (formerly ARPL 121), 211, 212); Art; Classics; Comparative Literature; Drama; English (102, 104 and 200 level or higher); Greek and Latin (above 104); History; Honors Culture & Technology (HSCT 101, 102, and others specifically designated); Honors Humanities (HSHU); Media Studies; Medieval & Byzantine Studies (MDST 201); and Modern Languages (above the 100 level).The Humanities courses are intended to complement the student's musical studies and should be carefully chosen in consultation with the adviser.

    • NOTE: Courses in History (including ancient history designated as Classics) may be selected to fulfill the requirements either in humanities or in social and behavioral science.
    7. Social and Behavioral Science

    Students must complete three courses from offerings of the following: Anthropology other than those designated as natural science [see CAUTION below], Business & Economics, Classics (ancient history only), Education, History, Honors Environmental Studies (HSEV 203, 204 only), Honors Social Science (HSSS), Politics, Psychology, Social Work, and Sociology.

    • NOTE: Courses in History (including CLAS courses in ancient history) may fulfill the requirements either in humanities or in social and behavioral science.
    • CAUTION: ANTH 105, 108, 218, 254 and 354 are designated as natural science anddo notfulfill the Social Science requirement. The student must check carefully into which distribution area an ANTH selection falls.
    8. English Composition

    All students must take English composition in the freshman year. The required course (determined by placement) is ENG 101 or 101a (103 for non-native speakers), or 105.

  • Independent Study

    For undergraduate music students, normally no more than four independent studies (except in cases approved by the dean) may be included in a degree program, and the student must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5.

    For graduate music students, a maximum of one-sixth of the program of graduate studies may be taken as Independent Study. (This refers to graduate level courses, not undergraduate prerequisites that may have to be fulfilled.)

    Independent Study request forms are available in the main office. The form must be filled out completely with all required information and signatures before the Academic Dean will approve it.

    A student may not take as an Independent Study a subject that is currently being taught as a course either during the academic year or in summer sessions.

    PLEASE NOTE:

    A student may not register for an Independent Study MUS number for a subject that he/she has failed* and is retaking. University policy requires that a course retaken must be the exact same MUS or MUPI catalog listing as the original. A student may retake the course in question in an Independent Study format, but a special procedure is in place to ensure that the GPA will automatically be recalculated in Cardinal Station after the course is retaken. Therefore, in these cases, before any registration takes place, the student must consult the Academic Dean, who in turn will work directly with the Office of Enrollment Services. 

    • The Undergraduate Announcements state that an undergraduate student may retake a course in which he/she has received a D or F. The Graduate Announcements state that a graduate student may retake a course in which he/she has received a C or F (the grade of D does not exist for graduate-level courses). In all cases, the repeated course must be the exact same MUS or MUPI listing as the original.
  • Juries and Recitals

    Including Secondary Piano Requirements (Composition and Instrumental Performance Majors)

    The jury component is an important facet of evaluating student progress. The student should consult his/her division jury requirements (see links below) to determine the percentage of jury grade and private instructor grade. If a student does not receive a passing grade from his/her private instructor, the student will be prohibited from performing a jury, and the private instructor's final grade will constitute 100% of the final grade for the semester.

    All music students using a MUPI course toward their curriculum must complete a jury at the end of each semester, with the following exceptions:
    • DMA students in composition, performance, or pedagogy in their major area. Minor area study still requires a jury.
    • MM students after they have fulfilled 6 credits in the major area.
    • Musical Theatre or Voice students who passed a recital hearing and gave a recital on or after midterm.
    • Instrumental students who passed a recital hearing and gave a recital any time during the semester.
    • First-year students in the voice division or music education with a voice principal in the first semester at CUA.
    • Any lessons in conducting or vocal coaching.
    • Any lessons taken in the summer session.
    • A student pursuing the BA in Music who takes private piano instruction in lieu of Class Piano (MUS 183 and 184)
    A music student (undergraduate and graduate in all levels) typically must take at least one credit of private instruction (MUPI) during the semester in which he/she is performing a degree recital. A student pursuing the BA in Music who takes private piano instruction in lieu of Class Piano (MUS 183 and 184) does not need to perform a jury. Piano principals and students pursuing a minor in piano do, however, need to perform a jury. The student must consult with his/her division head and/or adviser for further details.
    • Brass, Woodwinds, Percussion
    • Musical Theatre
    • Piano
    • Strings
    • Voice
    • Bachelor of Arts in Music: students must perform a jury during each semester in which the private instruction counts towards their degree requirements. The specific jury requirements are determined by the division in which the student is taking lessons.
  • Minor for Undergraduates

    (Also Called Subconcentration)

     

    Music Minor*

    The approved minors in the School of Music are:

    • the Minor in Composition;
    • the Minor in Conducting (Orchestral/Opera);
    • and the Minor in Piano.

    *A student who is majoring in music may not choose a music minor unless the minor has been approved by the music school. 

     

    Non-Music Minor

    The School of Music follows the policies of the School of Arts & Sciences regarding undergraduate minors (subconcentrations):

    • Normally, a program of eighteen (18) credits constitutes a minor.  However, since the definition and specification of a minor in a particular subject area is the responsibility of the department/school or program of that subject area, the student must consult with the department/school in question. 
    • Course substitutions are normally not permitted in a minor 
    • Pass/Fail courses may not count toward a minor.
    • No more than two of the six or seven courses constituting a minor may be transferred from other institutions.
    • In cases where a non-music minor is closely related to the music major, no more than two (2) courses may “overlap” between the major and minor requirements.  The same restriction applies if the minor is in English, Theology, or Philosophy.
    • A student who is majoring in music may normally complete only one minor.

     

    Procedure to Apply

    The student completes the Application for Minor.  The form is available from the music school office.  The music school will retain the form until the student is ready to graduate, at which time the form will be checked against the courses.  If the final senior audit confirms that the student has completed all requirements for the minor, the minor will be posted on the student's transcript.

  • Overelection

    Students should meet with their advisor to discuss over-election and whether or not they meet the eligibility requirements outlined above.  If the student meets the requirements the advisor should send an email to the Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies with an endorsement of over-election.

     

    Undergraduate students

    1. With permission of the dean, a Junior or Senior music major who has a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or better or who achieves a 3.5 grade point average at the end of a semester may request to enroll in the following semester for one additional credit beyond the allowable maximum of 21.
    2.  With permission of the dean, a music major may request in one semester of the Senior year a one-credit overelection without achieving the 3.5 grade point average.

    NB: The minimum full-time credit load for undergraduates is 12.

     

    Graduate students

    The normal maximum course load for a full-time graduate student in the school of music is 15 credit hours per semester. Overelection is not allowed except in extraordinary circumstances and only with permission of the dean. Unless approved by the dean of the school of music, teaching or research assistants may not enroll for more than nine semester hours per semester, depending upon the number of hours of teaching or research per week required by their appointments.

    NB: The minimum full-time credit load for graduate students is 8.

  • Piano Proficiency Requirements

    The Undergraduate Announcements state that students whose curricula require the Piano Proficiency Examination must complete the examination by the end of the junior year. A student will not be permitted to present the senior recital committee hearing until the examination is passed. The student must register for MUS 309 in the semester he/she plans to take the exam. MUS 309 is a pass/no-grade course.  An Incomplete is not permitted. 

     

    Musical Theatre Majors
    • All scales one octave, Major, harmonic, & melodic minor
      • hands together or hands separately
      • ascending and descending
    • Broken chords (major & minor) in all keys
      • including inversions   with correct fingering
      • hands together or hands separately
      • ascending and descending
    • Vocalise, in all keys (as directed by teacher)
    • Vocal Accompaniment (with singer)
    • Two Leadsheets in contrasting styles

     

    Vocal Performance Majors

    All students in vocal performance are required to take the Piano Proficiency exam at the end of second semester.   If the student does not pass the exam, the student is required to take additional piano study (group or private).   A student may choose, upon the recommendation of the teacher, to take the piano proficiency during the first semester of study.   This, however, does not waive the requirement of two semesters of study.   The following semester’s jury would then consist of representative material studied during that period.

    The Piano Proficiency exams are taken during exam week.   Students must sign up for jury times the week prior.   Sign-up sheets will be posted outside the Main Office on the bulletin board.   Students are to sign up for one ten-minute slot.   Any student who is not present for the jury will not have another chance due to time limitations.   Therefore, students are advised to arrive early for their juries and to be prepared with forms and grade slips.

    Students are required to fill out 3 grade sheets, 3 comment sheets, and one repertoire card.   Forms can be found in the Main Office.   It is advised that the teacher review the forms during the last lesson prior to the jury. 

    Incompletes are discouraged and approved only by the Dean of the  School  of  Music.

    Class piano students will take the Piano Proficiency during the scheduled final exam.   All class piano exams will be held in the piano lab (Room 130).    A committee of three piano faculty will serve on the jury, with the class piano teacher and piano pedagogy professor as two of the required members.

     

    Music Education Majors, Vocal & Instrumental
    • 4 semesters, 4 juries
    • piano proficiency required
    • Jury Requirements: Technical routine directed by teacher
    • (scales, arpeggios, exercises, etc.)
    • Three pieces in contrasting styles: one must be memorized

     

    Piano Proficiency Requirements: 

    • One patriotic song (prepared throughout the semester)
    • Student should be prepared to:
      • Provide an appropriate introduction
      • Transpose one half-step and one whole-step higher, and one half-step and one-whole step low (5 keys total)
      • Vocal accompaniment or instrumental accompaniment (48 hours in advance)
      • One harmonization of a folk melody (48 hours in advance).
    • Student should be prepared to:
      • Provide an appropriate introduction
      • Transpose one half-step and one whole-step higher, and one half-step and one whole-step lower (5 keys total)
      • One realization (48 hours in advance)
    • Student should be prepared to:
      • Provide an appropriate introduction
      • Transpose up one half-step higher, and one whole-step lower (3 keys total)
    • SATB score reading or transposing instruments (at sight)

    For Music Education majors, the Piano Proficiency exam is administered the first week of April and at a separate time from other juries.   Most students take the exam during sophomore year so as to have another chance before student teaching.   Information regarding time, date and place will be sent to all faculty during the first week in March.   There will also be enclosed a sheet for the teacher to fill out in regards to any other technique or repertoire the student has worked on throughout the semester, i.e., scales, chords & solos pieces.   No technical routine is required for the Piano Proficiency exam since demonstration of scale proficiency will have been heard during previous juries. A committee of three faculty members will serve on the jury, with the two music education advisors and piano pedagogy advisor as the required members.    

    The Piano Proficiency exam must be passed by the end of junior year in preparation for student teaching senior year.   Without passing the proficiency exams, students will not be allowed to student teach. 

     

    Music History & Literature 

    With the exception of the sightreading, the student will prepare all requirements ahead of time. 

    • Three classical pieces in contrasting style (1 memorized)
    • All major and minor scales (all three forms), 1 octave, hands separately
    • All major and minor broken chords (root, 1 st inversion, 2 nd inversion), hands separately
    • All church modes
    • Sightreading (student will receive this music two days prior to taking the exam)

     

  • Placement Examinations And Entrance Recitals

    Theory Placement Examination

    UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS: All incoming Freshmen are required to take an online Theory Evaluation Test, which is taken before coming to campus to begin their first semester. Based upon the results of this test, students will be placed in either Fundamentals of Music Theory I & II, both semesters of which must be passed prior to taking Ear Training and Sight Singing I and Harmony I; or Harmony I and Ear-Training I.  All incoming Transfer Students are required to take the Theory Placement Exam, typically given during Orientation (late August).  Click here for detailed information about Theory Placement Exam and the typical skills tested. 

    Freshmen, Transfer Students, and other students with extensive theory background may opt to take advanced standing exams to determine if they are qualified to place out of one or more semesters of Harmony and/or Ear Training and Sight Singing.  For detailed information, please contact Dr. Stephen Gorbos (gorbos@cua.edu). 

    GRADUATE STUDENTS: All Graduate Students, regardless of degree program, must take the Theory Placement Exam before they can enroll for classes.  Students who exhibit deficiencies in the area of harmony and/or eartraining will be placed in MUS 491 Graduate Harmony Review (a Fall semester two-credit course) and/or MUS 492 Graduate Aural Skills Review (a Spring semester two-credit course). The graduate student must receive a grade of C or higher in each of these two courses.  If the graduate student receives a grade lower than C, he/she must retake the course(s).  These courses are not calculated in the graduate GPA nor do they count toward degree requirements. Please note that (a) MUS 491 Graduate Harmony Review must be successfully completed before a student is eligible to take graduate level theory courses, and (b) the graduate student must fulfill MUS 491 and MUS 492 within a year of having taken the Theory Placement Exam.

    NOTE: If placed in both the Graduate Harmony Review and the Aural Skills Review, it is recommended that the student take the Harmony Review prior to the Aural Skills Review.

    Click here for detailed information about Theory Placement Exam and the typical skills tested.

    The student is asked to contact Dr. Stephen Gorbos, theory and composition division head, with questions (gorbos@cua.edu).

     

    Music History Placement Examination 

    All Graduate Students, regardless of degree program, must take the Music History Placement Exam before they can enroll for classes.  A student who exhibits deficiencies in the area of music history will be placed in MUS 490 Graduate Music History Review. The student must receive a D or higher in this prerequisite course.  If the student fails the course, he/she must retake it.  This course is not calculated in the graduate GPA nor does it count toward degree requirements. Click here for detailed information about the typical skills tested. The student is asked to contact Dr. Andrew Weaver, musicology division head, with questions (weavera@cua.edu).  For students entering Fall 2012, MUS 490 Graduate Music History Review must be successfully completed in order to beeligible to take any graduate level musicology course except MUS 731 Research Methodology, which may be taken before or concurrently with MUS 490.  Current students should consult Dr. Weaver with questions regarding those graduate level musicology courses that may be taken before the successful completion of MUS 490. Please note that the graduate student must fulfill MUS 490 within a year of having taken the Music History Placement Exam.

     

    Entrance Recitals

    MM Entrance Recitals

    The student must consult with his/her advisor about the masters entrance level requirement each Master of Music program has a different approach to the requirement, and some programs have no such requirement. It is therefore advisable for the student to consult directly to the adviser regarding the details and procedures.

    The entrance recital must be performed before the first semester of graduate study, or for serious reasons, the student may be permitted by the adviser to postpone it until the second semester, but normally not beyond.  The student chooses the program with guidance from the private teacher.  The student is asked to contact his/her adviser for further details.

    • Composition (specialized exams in 1st semester; no entrance recital requirement)
    • Piano (no entrance recital requirement)
    • Sacred Music (no entrance recital requirement)
    • Strings (no entrance recital requirement)
    • Woodwinds and Brass (no entrance recital requirement)
    • Voice 
      • Length to be prepared: 60 min. Memorized
      • Length heard at hearing: 20 min. The student may subsequently perform the entire recital program in a program in Ward Hall, though this is not required. The student must supply his/her own accompanist.
      • Program: A written program must be prepared and must list titles of works, movements, and composers.
      •  To be completed in 1st semester. Applied lesson credits do not count toward degree requirements until the entrance recital is passed.

    The student schedules the entrance recital with the production office (recitals-music@cua.edu).   The Recital Hearing Form, available from the main office (cua-music@cua.edu), must be filled out by the student and signed by the committee members.  

     

    DMA Entrance Recital and DMA Entrance Examinations

    Below outlines information about the DMA Entrance Recital and indicates which DMA Entrance Examinations doctoral graduate students are required to take for their particular program.  Both the DMA recital and Entrance Examinations, along with Music History and Music Theory Placement Examinations, must be taken before the first semester of graduate study.  For serious reasons, the student may be permitted by the adviser to postpone them until the second semester, but normally not beyond.

    • Examinations are two hours unless noted otherwise
    • Recital program of approximately 60-70 minutes duration is assigned by the DMA committee, from the applicants' repertoire and professional experience record.

    Composition

    Exams:
    • Music History Placement Exam
    • Music Theory Placement Exam + Program-Specific Entrance Exams: 5 hours total

    Entrance Recital:

    • None

    Sacred Music

    Exams:

    • Music History Placement Exam
    • Music Theory Placement Exam + Program-Specific Entrance Exams
    • Sacred and choral music

    Entrance Recital:

    • None
    • (audition; testing of keyboard proficiency, open score reading, sight-singing; interview—completed during application process.

    Orchestral Instruments

    Exams:

    • Music History Placement Exam
    • Music Theory Placement Exam

    Entrance Recital:

    • Yes

    Piano Performance - or - Piano Pedagogy

    Exams:

    • Music History Placement Exam
    • Music Theory Placement Exam + Program-Specific Entrance Exams
    • Piano pedagogy, materials and methods, history of the piano and piano playing;
    • Piano literature

    Entrance Recital:

    • Yes
    • Private performance of a chamber music work selected in consultation with the D.M.A. committee chair and performed without rehearsal
    • Private performance of a short piece designated to the applicant 24 hours in advance of the performance

    Vocal Accompanying (Piano)

    Exams:

    • Music History Placement Exam
    • Music Theory Placement Exam + Program-Specific Entrance Exams:
    • Vocal music literature
    • Piano-chamber literature

    Entrance Recital:

    • Yes
    • Private sight reading examination of vocal scores and transposition

    Chamber Music (Piano)

    Exams:

    • Music History Placement Exam
    • Music Theory Placement Exam + Program-Specific Entrance Exams:
    • Piano-vocal literature
    • Chamber music literature

    Entrance Recital:

    • Yes
    • Private sight reading examination

    Vocal Performance - or - Vocal Pedagogy

    Exams:

    • Music History Placement Exam
    • Music Theory Placement Exam

    Entrance Recital:

    • Yes

    Orchestral Conducting

    Exams:

    • Music History Placement Exam
    • Music Theory Placement Exam

    Entrance Recital:

    • Yes
    • (Audition, exams in: orchestral field & aural skills, interview—completed during application process)
  • Policies and Procedures of Specific Programs

  • Private Instruction Guidelines

    Each course in private instruction is designated with the abbreviation MUPI. MUPI courses are integral to the nature of the development of the performer on his/her instrument.

    Credit Hours

    For undergraduates and graduate students in elective study:

    • 7 contact hours is awarded 1 credit;
    • 14 contact hours is awarded 3 credits.

    For graduates:

    • 5 contact hours is awarded 1 credit;
    • 9 contact hours is awarded 2 credits (or 10 hours, summer only);
    • 14 contact hours is awarded 3 credits.
    Juries

    The jury component is an important facet of evaluating student progress.  The jury will be evaluated by a faculty committee. Committee grades will be averaged (50%) with the private instructor's grade (50%) to determine the final grade for the semester. In semesters where no jury takes place, the instructor's grade will constitute 100% of the final grade. All music students using a MUPI course toward their curriculum must complete a jury at the end of each semester, with the following exceptions:

    • DMA students in composition, performance, or pedagogy in their major area. Minor area study still requires a jury.
    • MM students after they have fulfilled 6 credits in the major area.
    • Musical Theatre  or Voice students who passed a recital hearing and gave a recital on or after midterm.
    • Instrumental students who passed a recital hearing and gave a recital any time during the semester.
    • First-year students in the voice division or music education with a voice principal in the first semester at CUA.
    • Any lessons in conducting or vocal coaching.
    • Any lessons taken in the summer session.
  • Registration Forms for Graduate-Level Comprehensive Exams

    (master’s and doctoral students)

    Registration for Comprehensive Examinations and Adviser Audit: A graduate student planning to sit for comprehensive examinations must register online for the semester he/she plans to sit for them and before the drop/add deadline. In addition, one of the forms found on the following pages is to be completed for each MAJOR and MINOR Comprehensive Examination a graduate student must take. The student must complete the top portion and submit the form to his/her adviser, who will review and sign it, attach an audit of coursework, and submit to the Assistant Dean for Academics for final approval at least two weeks before the date of the examination. The student cannot sit for the comprehensive examinations without having followed these procedures even if he/she has registered for them. The student chooses the registration form pertinent to his/her particular degree program and type of comprehensive (major/minor):

    • Master of Arts (M.A.)
    • Master of Music in Composition (M.M.)
    • Master of Music in Sacred Music (M.M.S.M.)
    • Master of Music in Piano Pedagogy and Vocal Pedagogy
    • Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) (to be used for both MAJOR and MINOR Comprehensive Examinations)
    • Doctor of Music in Sacred Music (D.M.A.)
    • Doctor of Musical Arts (D.M.A.) in Composition
    • Doctor of Musical Arts (D.M.A.) in Piano Pedagogy and Vocal Pedagogy (to be used for both MAJOR and MINOR Comprehensive Examinations)
    • Doctor of Musical Arts (D.M.A.) in Orchestral Conducting
    • Minor in Musicology (for D.M.A. students in performance degree programs)

     

    Course Numbers:

    For Master's students:

    • MUS 698A (w/ classes)
    • MUS 698B (w/o classes)

    For Doctoral students:

    • MUS 998A (w/ classes)
    • MUS 998B (w/o classes)

     

    Dates and Times for Comprehensive Examinations: 

    Dates and times are listed under the notes section within the course information in Cardinal Station. Comprehensive exams will be administered between 9am and 1pm on the dates listed.  

    Location of Comprehensive Examinations: Normally, comprehensive examinations are held in the School of Music. Please contact cua-music@cua.edu

     

    Use of computers: Please inquire of cua-music@cua.edu regarding the use of a computer (with Internet access shut off) for the purpose of typing one’s responses. Be aware that most comprehensive examinations in music also require hand writing directly on scores.

     

    What is allowed and what is not allowed in the room: Bottled water is permitted, but no food or other drink.  No books, papers, or other reference items are permitted in the room unless express permission has been previously granted by the dean’s office.

     

    Proctor: The student is expected to follow all instructions of the Proctor regarding all matters pertaining to the exams, including permission to leave the room to use the restrooms.

     

    Results: The student should expect to receive the results of the comprehensive examinations within three to four weeks of the exams, longer for comps taken in summer (July).

  • Relationship between Adviser and Advisee

    [This section adapted from the Advising Handbook of the School of Arts & Sciences]

    Advising is crucial to the academic process.  In order for it to succeed, however, both advisers and advisees must have a clear understanding of what to expect from each other.  The following statement of rights and respon­sibilities will help reduce misunderstanding and create an optimal climate for communication.
     

    The Advisee

    Rights

    The advisee has a right to expect his/her adviser to be available at reason­able times throughout each semester and on a more consistent basis during registration.

    The advisee has a right to expect his/her adviser to be know­ledgeable about (a) the merits or disadvantages of various course selections for preparation in their field, (b) academic regulations and administra­tive procedures, (c) registration procedures, and (d) professional and career oppor­tunities in the major field.

    The advisee has a right to expect his/her adviser to seek out relevant information when not knowledgeable about a specific topic, or to refer him/her to the school or university office that can provide additional resources and assistance—for example, the Academic Dean, Counseling Center, or Career Services.

    Responsibilities

    The advisee has a responsibility to know the academic regula­tions and procedures contained in the Undergraduate or Graduate Announce­ments, as well as other university publications, and to select courses of studies conforming to those regulations.

    The advisee has a responsibility to consult with his/her adviser before or during registration periods at reasonable times (during office hours or during scheduled appointments), to seek assistance on complex matters at other than very busy times, and to inform the adviser of his/her expected graduation date.

    The advisee has a responsibility to make preliminary choices of courses prior to consulting with his/her adviser during registration and, after consultation, has a responsibility to complete the required steps in the registration process.

    The advisee has a responsibility to (a) complete the registration work sheet by (b) obtain the signature of the adviser, (c) obtain all departmental clearances in the main office, (d) register on-line for the courses he/she has decided upon with the guidance of the adviser, and (e) make a printout of the courses selected.  Note: The advisee should make a printout of the courses after every drop or add entered into Cardinal Station.  The printout has the double advantage of confirming that the courses the advisee has registered for have actually been accepted by CS and of serving as proof of the registration process in the event that a question arises later on.

    The Adviser

    Rights
    The adviser has a right to expect the advisee to be knowledgeable about his/her own academic progress, particularly about the courses that he/she has taken and is currently taking.

    1. The adviser has a right to expect the advisee to see him/her during scheduled office hours and to check in advance to determine interview times or appointments for registration purposes.
    2. The adviser has a right to expect the advisee to keep appoint­ments or to notify the adviser of cancellations.

    Responsibilities*

    1. The adviser has a responsibility to maintain adequate office hours to handle the number of students he/she advises and to be available for individual interviews at mutually convenient times before or during the registration period each semester.
    2. The adviser has a responsibility to be knowledgeable about university policies and about rules and regulations governing under­graduate or graduate education, to stay abreast of changes in academic regulations, procedures and programs, and to incorporate this information into any interview.
    3. The adviser has a responsibility to assist the advisee in learning about educational support services available at the university that will enhance the learning process (study skill labs, tutoring, etc.) and to assist the advisee, as far as possible, in defining professional and career goals.
    4. The adviser has a responsibility to provide the advisee with the four-digit numbers for registration of private lessons (MUPI).  Lists of MUPI four-digit numbers are provided each semester at pre-registration time.  In addition, the adviser has a responsibility to sign the work sheet of the advisee in all cases, and in particular when the advisee must seek departmental clearance(s).
    5. The adviser has the responsibility to do periodic assessments of advisees to see that degree requirements are being fulfilled, to keep a tracking sheet* in the academic file and update it each semester, to be knowledgeable of the expected graduation date of his/her advisees, and to complete a final audit for the review of the Assistant Dean for Academics prior to graduation (forms and procedures obtainable from the Assistant Dean for Academics).

    * Advisers of Bachelor of Music students have access to the online tracking sheet (and unofficial transcript) of the advisees assigned to him/her. The adviser may choose to use this tracking sheet exclusively or in combination with the paper-based tracking sheets.  In either case, an up-to-date copy should always be in the academic file. Currently, only paper-based tracking sheets are available for master’s and doctoral students.

  • Student Recital Scheduling Policy and Procedure

    1. Recitals and dress rehearsals must be scheduled two weeks in advance.
      1. Failure to secure a date two weeks in advance may result in not securing a date.
      2. Please inform the production office (music-recitals@cua.edu) if you are planning on changing or canceling your recital.
        1. Please inform the production office at least two weeks prior to the scheduled recital if you wish to change the recital date.
          1. Failure to do so may result in not securing a new date.
        2. Because of limited space we cannot hold multiple dates.

    2. All questions regarding dress rehearsals, scheduling, programs, and/or recitals should be directed to music-recitals@cua.edu 
      1. Recitals may only be scheduled via the recital request form.
      2. All emails will be answered within 2-3 business days.
      3. Emails not sent to this address will not be answered and will delay the scheduling process.

    3. Programs should be sent to music-recitals@cua.edu no later than two weeks before the scheduled recital. Failure to do so may result in the absence of a program at the recital.

    4. Students are required to leave the hall as they found it. Please return the hall to the original setting.
      1. The student is also responsible for the acquisition and maintenance of all equipment used. Please return all equipment after the completion of the recital. This is the student’s responsibility.
  • Make a Request for a Degree Recital

    To schedule a recital, please first fill out the page found on the school of music “incoming and current student” page or the link:

    https://music.catholic.edu/academics/incoming-current-music-students/recital-program-request.html

  • Transfer Course Evaluation

    (EVALUATION OF EQUIVALENCY)

    PURPOSE:  To permit students to take courses elsewhere and to know in advance for which CUA courses these can be substituted.

    WHEN:  Any time before the student enrolls for the course.  A student who wishes to take summer courses elsewhere should submit the evaluation form before leaving campus.  Often a May 1st deadline is imposed.  If a student takes a course elsewhere without having it evaluated ahead of time, CUA cannot guarantee transfer credit.

    Evaluation of equivalency does not guarantee credit.  To receive credit, the course(s) must meet all applicable university policies.

     

    LIMITATIONS ON THE AMOUNT OF TRANSFER CREDIT:

    The school specifically limits the number of courses that may be transferred: 

    1. total transfer courses within a degree program are limited to half;
    2. transfer by advanced students is limited to 2 of the last 12 courses for the degree;
    3. the number of courses that may be transferred after matriculation is limited to two times the years in residence; and
    4. the number of courses transferred from summer sessions is limited to two per year.

    A student may not transfer courses taken elsewhere during an academic term when the student was enrolled full-time at CUA.

    A student who does not meet criteria to participate in CUA Study Abroad programs may not transfer to CUA credits earned in a study abroad program offered by another institution.

    FORMS:  Form for Evaluation of Off-Campus Courses, available in the Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Office, 107 McMahon. The student is responsible for following all required procedures in order to transfer external courses to his/her CUA record.

    PROCEDURE:  Evaluations are not handled by telephone. Complete the appropriate sections of the Form for Evaluation of Off-Campus Courses, including (for each course) course, number, credit hours, and dates of session.

    If the course(s) listed on the form have not been previously evaluated, the student must submit to the Undergraduate Office an official description as published in the external school's course catalog. In addition, a syllabus is required for courses offered by 2-year community colleges, or if requested by the evaluating department at CUA. The student is responsible for providing sufficient information about the course to allow CUA to evaluate it.

     

    The Transfer Coordinator in the Office of A&S arranges the evaluation: This procedure takes at least one week.The student will be notified when it is complete, and may obtain a copy of the completed form, which lists the CUA equivalent for the course and indicates whether it is acceptable for major, distribution, and/or free elective credit, or if no credit will be transferred. 

     

    Students may obtain evaluations for courses without committing themselves to take the courses in question.  For its part, the univer­sity waives no requirements.  Students approaching the senior year should remember that ten of the last twelve courses for a degree must be taken at CUA.

     

    NOTE: The following types of courses are generally not accepted for transfer: correspondence courses; internet or web-based courses with minimal classroom contact; "life experience" credit; courses meeting for long hours over a few days; summer courses offered in sessions of less than 3 weeks; winter or summer session courses elsewhere that overlap a CUA session for which the student is enrolled; CLEP credit done after college matriculation; study abroad courses emphasizing travel or tourism over academics; or courses not appropriate for the CUA degree.

                 

    Coursework may be acceptable for CUA credit even if no equivalent course is offered at CUA. However, courses in subject areas not granted credit at CUA—for example, "student success," physical education, recreation, or emergency medical training—may not be transferred. Courses of fewer than 3 semester credits (or 5 quarter credits) will not be transferred.

    • A student may not transfer courses taken elsewhere during an academic session when the student was enrolled full-time at CUA
    • A student who does not meet criteria to participate in CUA Study Abroad programs may not transfer to CUA credits earned in a study abroad program offered by another institution. See the section on Study Abroad.
    • No credit will be given for a transfer course whose CUA equivalent has also been taken by the student.
    • A minimum grade of C is required for all transferred courses.
  • Transfer Students and Transfer Credits

    Undergraduates

    The Undergraduate Announcements indicate the following policy:

     

    Transfer credits: For credits to be transferred from another institution, the other institution must be regionally accredited, the grade received in the course must be "C" or higher, the course must be applicable to the degree being pursued at CUA, and the course must first be evaluated for equivalency.  When transferring credits, if a student's prior institution awarded more credits for a course than CUA awards for an equivalent course, only the number of credits awarded by CUA will be granted for the course; surplus credits for the course may be used as free music elective credits, if necessary. If a student's prior institution awarded fewer credits for a course than CUA awards for an equivalent course, the missing credits must be made up in music electives. An exception to this latter policy will be applied lessons for which the student's prior institution awarded two semester hours of credit for 14 hour-long lessons during a semester; in such cases, CUA will award three semester hours of credit.

     

    From other universities:

    The division chair/advisor suggests all music and drama courses for possible transfer.  All courses other than music and drama courses are submitted to the School of Arts and Sciences for evaluation. These courses might include English, Philosophy, Theology, and those that can fulfill Academic (free) Electives in the student’s music degree program.   Posting of courses eligible for transfer is done in the School of Music.  Only courses with grades of C or higher and which meet the criteria of the University and the School of Music may be transferred.

    Transfer students take two Theology/Religious Studies (TRS) courses:  one 200-level Christian Tradition TRS course and one 300-level TRS course of one’s choice.   The student is asked to consult his/her curriculum for further details about the choice of TRS courses.

    Transfer students are asked to consult the Undergraduate Announcements for policies related to the Waiver of Coursework or Credit by Examination and Performing Organization Requirements.

                                                           

    From other schools of the university:

    A student who transfers from another school of the university to the music school must first audition.  The student must complete eight (8) semesters of private instruction.  It may be possible to double up on performing organization credits for one or more semesters, as needed.   A student can possibly also take extra private instruction credits during the summer.  However, because of the transfer from the other school, he/she may have to enroll in extra semesters beyond the normal four years in order to complete all the requirements of the Bachelor of Music degree.  Requirements already completed in the previous school, such as English, Philosophy, Theology, as well as courses that can be used for Academic Electives in the music program, can be transferred. Note: For music undergraduates, three Theology (TRS) courses are required: two 200-level courses, one of which must be a Christian tradition course, and one 300-level course.  The student is asked to consult his/her curriculum for further details about the choice of TRS courses.

     

    ***

    College courses taken in high school:

     

    The School of Music follows the policy of the School of Arts and Sciences in the determination as to whether college courses taken while the student was in high school can or cannot be transferred.  The student should consult the following link for further information and should follow the instructions regarding the submission to Dr. Joseph Santo, Assistant Dean, of the High School Confirmation Form embedded in the link:

    http://arts-sciences.cua.edu/undergraduate/advising-handbook/College-Courses-in-High-School.cfm

     

     

    TRANSFER COURSES

    taken by CUA students, e.g. in summer, with the intention of transferring them in

    A CUA student may choose to take a course in the summer months at another institution.  Before registering at the other institution, the student must have the course evaluated.  If it is a music course, the student should contact the Division Chair to get the course evaluated.  For example, if the student wants to take Form and Analysis at another institution, he/she must first consult with Dr. Andrew Simpson, Theory and Composition chairperson.  We do not transfer private instruction.  If the course in question is non-music, then the course must be evaluated by the Arts and Sciences clearinghouse established for this purpose. Forms are available in the main office. There is usually a May 1st deadline.

    Transfer courses and the GPA: Only courses taken at CUA are calculated into the GPA.  If a student fails a course at CUA and retakes it at another institution, the original F will not be removed and the GPA will not be recalculated.  It is to the student’s advantage to retake courses at CUA so that the F can be overridden in the system and the GPA recalculated accordingly.  Cardinal Station notes that a course in which one has received an F has been successfully retaken.

     

    POLICY ON TRANSFER CREDITS

     

    Undergraduate Students:

    The Undergraduate Announcements indicate the following policy:

     

    For credits to be transferred from another institution, the other institution must be regionally accredited, the grade received in the course must be "C" or higher, the course must be applicable to the degree being pursued at CUA, and the course must first be evaluated for equivalency.  When transferring credits, if a student's prior institution awarded more credits for a course than CUA awards for an equivalent course, only the number of credits awarded by CUA will be granted for the course; surplus credits for the course may be used as free music elective credits, if necessary. If a student's prior institution awarded fewer credits for a course than CUA awards for an equivalent course, the missing credits must be made up in music electives. An exception to this latter policy will be applied lessons for which the student's prior institution awarded two semester hours of credit for 14 hour-long lessons during a semester; in such cases, CUA will award three semester hours of credit.

     

    Graduate Students:

    Master’s students: The School of Music follows university policy with regard to transfer credits for Master’s students (http://policies.cua.edu/academicgrad//mastersfull.cfm), as stated in the Graduate Announcements:

     

    Six semester hours of graduate work earned at another accredited institution, in which a student received grades of B or above may be applied toward course requirements for the master's degree, upon recommendation of the appropriate department and with the approval of the academic dean. Students in master's degree programs, which require a minimum of two years of full-time residence, may be permitted to transfer up to the maximum number of credits earned during one year of residence in an accredited program at another university.

     

    Ph.D. students: The School of Music follows university policy with regard to transfer credits for Ph.D. students (http://policies.cua.edu/academicgrad/doctoralfull.cfm#iv), as stated in the Graduate Announcements:

     

    *Up to 24 semester hours of graduate work earned at another accredited institution in which the student received a grade of B or better may be applied toward course requirements for the doctoral degree upon recommendation of the appropriate department and with the approval of the academic dean.  Transfer of credit must be approved before permission is given to take the comprehensive examination.

    **D.M.A. Students: The School of Music does not follow university policy with regard to transfer credits for D.M.A. students. Please refer to the policy below, as stated in the School of Music section of the Graduate Announcements.

    ***The provisions regarding the transfer of credits stated under the heading The Doctoral Degree in the General Information section of the Graduate Announcements do not usually apply to the D.M.A. degree. A limited number of post-master's degree credits earned at another institution at a grade level of B or better prior to the student's first enrollment at CUA may be accepted with the approval of the faculty and dean of the school.