Fleta Hylton

Division

  • Musical Theatre
  • School

  • Benjamin T. Rome School of Music
  • Fleta Hylton (M.M. University of Southern California magna cum laude, B.M. University of Arizona) is a former finalist in the Metropolitan Opera Auditions (Mid-Atlantic Region), and has performed extensively in both opera and concert. She has been the soprano soloist numerous times at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, including performances of “Carmina Burana”, both the Brahms’ and Mozart “Requiem” the Vaughn-Williams “Sea Symphony” and “Messiah.”    

    Her operatic performances have met with critical acclaim, referred to as “an extraordinary soprano” and “a singing actress.” Major operatic roles include the title roles in “Daughter of the Regiment” and “Martha”, Susanna in “The Marriage of Figaro”, Violetta in “La Traviata”, Musetta in “La Bohème”, Clorinda in “La Cenerentola”, Despina in “Così fan Tutte” and Donna Elvira in “Don Giovanni.” Companies include Arizona Opera, Ash Lawn-Highland Summer Opera, Annapolis Opera, Summer Opera Theater (Washington DC), Capital City Opera, Washington National Opera, and numerous roles for Washington Concert Opera.

    Miss Hylton has been teaching music theater majors for ten years at CUA. She has directed a "Boot Camp for Singers" thru the Washington Savoyards, a staged music theater performance for 16 students at the Atlas Theater. Her CUA music theater grads have been cast on national tours out of New York, been in the Miss America Pageant (Atlantic City) and cast on a national tour of an original children's show produced by the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington DC.

    Miss Hylton also attended the Bach Akademie in Stuttgart, Germany and is increasingly in demand as an adjudicator and judge in national vocal competitions. She is the Voice Department Chair of the Levine School of Music in Washington DC and is also adjunct voice faculty at the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music at Catholic University, where she has taught voice, song literature, and diction.